Wine Review: 2013 Mount Pleasant B-Side CF13 Dry Red (Hunter Valley)

Wine Review: 2013 Mount Pleasant B-Side CF13 Dry Red (Hunter Valley)

Over the past decade or so, the Hunter Valley has really revealed itself, not only as a bastion of youthful energy that has transformed the region as a locus for contemporary wines but also in resurrecting respect for the vines and vineyards that came before them. New bottlings highlighting individual plots of ancient vines are weaving compelling wines into the fabric of the Hunter. All of this after a decade or so that has seen Hunter semillon and shiraz reach new heights of quality.

The renewed respect for the older vines that are the backbone of the Hunter has led to many folks to take an even deeper look at what is actually planted there. While Australia does not compare when it comes to the wide variety of varietals grown in California, there are plots here and there that contain some pretty interesting stuff. McWilliams, one of the Hunter’s oldest wineries and owner of Mount Pleasant Winery, home to legendary winemaker Maurice O’Shea, is home to a rarity named montils. The grape recently found a home in their new wine program entitled B-Side which is devoted to experimental, small batch winemaking.

The original home for montils is in the Cognac region of France where it’s also used to make eau-de-vie. It ended up in the Hunter as part of the Busby collection of grapes that contributed to the foundation of Australia’s wine industry back in the 1830s. Prized for its ability to maintain a low pH in warm climates, it has fallen out of favor in France.

13332915_10153670472171149_3571934894324661444_nNew plantings of the grape have been recently arranged from the original vines that were planted in the 1920s at the winery’s home vineyard. Winemaker Scott McWilliams decided to round up some shiraz planted by O’Shea in his Rosehill vineyard back in 1946 and co-ferment the two grapes as was done back in the day. Because there was so little montils available, only 800 bottles were made.

The result is a translucent, pale red wine that is a perfect wine for those desirous of a lighter styled wine. Fresh and crunchy red fruits fill the palate but resonate lightly thanks to some crisp acids. Bits of spice and light tannins frame the whole experience, both aromatically and texturally, thanks to a bit of stems in the ferment and old Hungarian oak. A couple of years should see this wine pick up a bit of weight and the acidity mellow.

This is a great window into Australia’s movement towards lighter, fresher red wines that are also seen in wines like 2015 Te Mata Gamay Noir and 2015 De Bortoli La Boheme Syrah/Gamay. These local products are starting to populate the hipster wine bar scene there and could easily make a splash in the States. Quaffable and refreshing, one can feel the mustache grow and the tats form a sleeve on your arm as you quickly polish off the glass and reach for another.

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